Ozette Nootka

The Ozette-Nootka potato is likely the descendent of a potato planted in Nootka Bay on Vancouver Island as early as 1791. Unlike most other potatoes grown in North America today, which arrived from potatoes grown in Europe, the Ozette Nootka was brought directly from South America by Spanish settlers.
Ozette Nootka is highly promising – it has had top yields at all locations and appears to be productive in a wide range of climatic conditions. The tubers used in the crop-climate project originate from material brought to Victoria from the Makah Reserve in the late 1980’s and grown and shared locally by Richard Hebda.

Ozette potatoes grown in 2012 in Victoria, British Columbia

Ozette potatoes grown in 2012 in Victoria, British Columbia

Ozette rarely flowers.  Buds like these often abort before opening.

Ozette rarely flowers. Buds like these often abort before opening.

GENERAL

Maturity: Late

Skin colour: pale gold

Flesh colour: creamy yellow

Tuber Shape: Fingerling

Origin and Breeding: The Ozette Nootka potato is likely the descendent of a potato planted in Nootka Sound on Vancouver Island as early as 1791. Unlike most other potatoes grown in North America today, which arrived from potatoes grown in Europe, the Ozette-Nootka was brought directly from South America by Spanish settlers.

Year registered in Canada:

AGRICULTURAL FEATURES

Ozette-Nootka is highly promising – it has had top yields at all locations and appears to be productive in a wide range of climatic conditions. The plants are very large, with vines as long as 2 m. They rarely flower and only die back in extremely dry conditions or with a hard frost.

Yield: Trials suggest it is relatively high yielding under a variety of conditions.

Dormancy:

Storability:

Utilization: Steamed, fried or roasted.

Environmental Stress:

DISEASE AND INSECT SUSCEPTIBILITY

 

Moderately resistant:

Moderately susceptible:

Susceptible:

NOTES:

Slow Food USA says this: The potato has an earthy and nutty flavor that is similar to the taste sensed in cooked dry beans. The flesh is firm and the texture is very creamy. The Ozette is generally served steamed, fried, or roasted.

SOURCES:

Slow Food USA The Potato of the Makah Nation

In two years of trials, Ozette has consistently yielded well with little insect or disease damage.

2013

    • Ozette yields were high in 3 British Columbia locations (Saanich, Metchosin, and William’s Lake), yet significantly lower under field conditions in Gananoque, Ontario.
Tuber yields per plant of four varieties grown in five locations in 2013.

Tuber yields per plant of four varieties grown in five locations in 2013.

  • No disease or insect problems were reported at any location.
  • William’s Lake growers report that Ozette has an “earthy flavour.”
  • Winlaw grower reports it tastes “just like a russet.”

2012

  • Ozette had small holes in the leaves (likely spider mites) at Gananoque in its early growth stages. Later on, potato beetles were found on several plants.
  • Leaf edge browning was reported by both Gananoque and Victoria later in the season. No further details are provided as to whether it was part of the natural drying process or some type of disease.
  • In Victoria, yield was good and the tuber quality was “excellent.”